MEDITATION FOR BEGINNERS

Meditation is great for reducing inflammation by impacting changes in the brain’s functional connectivity. We asked Kat Pither, Founder of YOGI BARE (@yogi.bare), a couple of questions to help you get into meditation (if you haven’t already). What advice would you give to someone starting meditation? “You have…

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Meditation is great for reducing inflammation by impacting changes in the brain’s functional connectivity. We asked Kat Pither, Founder of YOGI BARE (@yogi.bare), a couple of questions to help you get into meditation (if you haven’t already).

What advice would you give to someone starting meditation?

“You have to find what works for you. Do you love walking in nature and being outdoors? Do you have access to a quiet space? Is the only free time you feel you have during your 5 minute morning ritual staring into space while brewing coffee? Do you need an active meditation or something more passive? Or do you need headphones and music because you need to tap into the back-pocket tool of meditation on your commute or in the office? Because that’s what Meditation is. It’s your ‘Ace card’ to pull whenever you need it. It doesn’t have to be strict or stern or perfect or trigger guilt. It’s this neat little secret super power to tap into when you need it.”

“Meditation is about allowing yourself a brief moment to step out of and back from your life and notice how you feel and notice the wonder around you. That might be on a walk allowing your finger tips to brush over blades of  dewy grass and leaves and simmer in the sensations and textures, noticing the dappled sunlight. It might be allowing sounds and emotion of instrumental music to wash over you and fall away with them. It might be placing a hand on your belly and one on your chest and noticing the gentle rising and falling and losing yourself to the rhythm. Or it might just be thinking of five things you are thankful for in a single moment. Whatever it is – make it you.”

Can meditation improve someone’s health in the context of a busy modern lifestyle?

“We are not supposed to live like this. We’ve created exterior brains in the form of mobiles which means the world can access us at any time, any place. We lack boundaries and technology lacks empathy. It doesn’t sympathise to our stimulation overload. We are bombarded with adverts and comparison, unable to connect and participate in life unless we have online banking, an email address and a social account. And yet we aren’t really connecting at all. We’ve never been so disconnected. So advanced yet so unnatural. When our technology is broken or not working, we turn it off for a bit and then we turn it back on again. Often, we don’t really know what this does. All we know is that it resets something.”

“Its kinda the same with mediation. We don’t have to understand the deep biological responses going on in the nervous system, we just have to have a little faith and trust in the way it makes us feel. And how that feeling ripples into our greater day. Melting away overwhelming feelings, providing clarity and taking our breath out of a heightened state which signifies to the brain to be fight or flight or anxiety ridden. There is no danger if we know we can handle it. Tasks become manageable, priorities reshuffle and we feel connected to our natural state of being. So that when we do have all our apps singing and pinging at once we don’t catastrophise – we see them for what they really are, from behind the boundary.”